April 17, 2014
Left, photograph by Rocco Morabito, The Kiss of Life - Employee performs mouth to mouth resuscitation on his unconscious colleague after receiving an electric shock, Jacksonville, USA, 1967. (The company employee survived the accident and the photo won the Pulitzer Prize in 1968.) Via. Right, photograph by Kent Andreason. Via. More.

Left, photograph by Rocco Morabito, The Kiss of Life - Employee performs mouth to mouth resuscitation on his unconscious colleague after receiving an electric shock, Jacksonville, USA, 1967. (The company employee survived the accident and the photo won the Pulitzer Prize in 1968.) Via. Right, photograph by Kent Andreason. Via. More.

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Filed under: diptych 
April 17, 2014

Mayhem, directed by Abigail Child, 1987, from the seven-part series of films Is This What You Were Born For?. Via.

So many versions of an event are constructed and reconstructed, it’s as if you take a train through many cities, and each one has the same town sign at each station, Montpelier, and when you’re finished, someone asks you to describe Montpelier and you stare at them and don’t know what to say. My memory of all my life is like that. Of course, I lived it myself and I ought to remember it as it really was, but I’ve heard so many versions of it, so many descriptions of my mind and character, so many interpretations of my motives that only now and then can I remember the original landscape.

Susan Fromberg Schaeffer, The Madness of a Seduced Woman, 1983. Via.

(via experimentalcinema)

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Filed under: car fetish quotes 
April 17, 2014
Top, Daniel Gordon, Tropical Still Life, from the series The Green Line, 2012, C-Print, 50 x 60 inches. See also, STILL LIFES, PORTRAITS & PARTS, 2013, published by Mörel. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Mario Banana 1, directed by Andy Warhol, 1964. Watch. More.

Top, Daniel Gordon, Tropical Still Life, from the series The Green Line, 2012, C-Print, 50 x 60 inches. See also, STILL LIFES, PORTRAITS & PARTS, 2013, published by Mörel. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Mario Banana 1, directed by Andy Warhol, 1964. Watch. More.

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Filed under: diptych 
April 16, 2014
Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.
—
He opened his eyes, and everything disappeared. This wasn’t another world—it was his same old world turning an unfamiliar side toward him, revealing it for an instant, then immediately sealing it off, before he even had the chance to investigate.
Arkady & Boris Strugatsky, Roadside Picnic, 1971.

Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.

He opened his eyes, and everything disappeared. This wasn’t another world—it was his same old world turning an unfamiliar side toward him, revealing it for an instant, then immediately sealing it off, before he even had the chance to investigate.

Arkady & Boris Strugatsky, Roadside Picnic, 1971.

April 13, 2014
Top, Sheila Hicks, Linen Lean-To, 1967-68, Tapestry Bas-Relief. Via. Bottom, photograph by Lara Shipley (in collaboration with Anton Dolezal), Jeannie’s art, from the series Devils Promenade, 2012. Via.
—
(…) the “aura of exceptionality” and the associated isolation results in the fact that “female artists of the twentieth century were institutionally recognized only on the condition that they were in a certain respect describable as exceptions, or - formulated in a an overstated way - remained the exceptions. For each epoch, generation or art movement, art historiography allows but one exceptional woman. She is an island in an ocean of men.
Julia Voss, Gentlemen’s club of modernity, or the wolf in sheep’s clothing - from 1937 to the present: On the continuation of a tradition that no one acknowledges, translated from German by Karl Hoffmann, for Texte Zur Kunst issue 84, December 2011.
—
See also, Jerry Saltz on Finding Vivian Maier: An Invisible Artist and the Man Who Found Her.

Top, Sheila Hicks, Linen Lean-To, 1967-68, Tapestry Bas-Relief. Via. Bottom, photograph by Lara Shipley (in collaboration with Anton Dolezal), Jeannie’s art, from the series Devils Promenade, 2012. Via.

(…) the “aura of exceptionality” and the associated isolation results in the fact that “female artists of the twentieth century were institutionally recognized only on the condition that they were in a certain respect describable as exceptions, or - formulated in a an overstated way - remained the exceptions. For each epoch, generation or art movement, art historiography allows but one exceptional woman. She is an island in an ocean of men.

Julia Voss, Gentlemen’s club of modernity, or the wolf in sheep’s clothing - from 1937 to the present: On the continuation of a tradition that no one acknowledges, translated from German by Karl Hoffmann, for Texte Zur Kunst issue 84, December 2011.

See also, Jerry Saltz on Finding Vivian Maier: An Invisible Artist and the Man Who Found Her.

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Filed under: diptych quotes 
April 7, 2014
Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.
See also, ERINNERUNG AUS EINEM SWAN, and Rehearsed Lies.

Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.

See also, ERINNERUNG AUS EINEM SWAN, and Rehearsed Lies.

April 7, 2014
Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.

Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.

April 7, 2014
Australia’s highest court found that the 1995 Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act (New South Wales) recognized that a person’s sex might be ambiguous and “does not require that people who, having undergone a sex affirmation procedure, remain of indeterminate sex — that is, neither male nor female — must be registered, inaccurately, as one or the other. The Act itself recognises that a person may be other than male or female and therefore may be taken to permit the registration sought, as ‘nonspecific.’ ”

Julia Baird, Neither Female Nor Male, for the NYT, April 2014.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
April 6, 2014
Top, photograph by Luigi Ghirri, Scandiano, 1971. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Nymphomaniac, directed by Lars Von Trier, 2013. Via.
—
No doubt the room, even if we have seen it only once before, awakens memories to which other, older memories cling, or perhaps some were dormant in us, of which we now become conscious. The resurrection at our awakening - after that beneficent attack of mental alienation which is sleep - must after all be similar to what occurs when we recall a name, a line, a refrain that we had forgotten. And perhaps the resurrection of the soul after death is to be conceived as a phenomenon of memory.
Marcel Proust, In Search of Lost Time: the Guermantes Way, 1871–1922. Via.

Top, photograph by Luigi Ghirri, Scandiano, 1971. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Nymphomaniac, directed by Lars Von Trier, 2013. Via.

No doubt the room, even if we have seen it only once before, awakens memories to which other, older memories cling, or perhaps some were dormant in us, of which we now become conscious. The resurrection at our awakening - after that beneficent attack of mental alienation which is sleep - must after all be similar to what occurs when we recall a name, a line, a refrain that we had forgotten. And perhaps the resurrection of the soul after death is to be conceived as a phenomenon of memory.

Marcel Proust, In Search of Lost Time: the Guermantes Way, 1871–1922. Via.

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Filed under: diptych quotes 
April 5, 2014
Top, Tacita Dean, Ship of Death, from the series The Russian Ending, 2001, Photo-etching on paper, 45 x 68,5 cm. Via. Bottom, photograph by Alain de Rain, Untitled, 2014. Via.
See also.
—
Pinsons épaisseur picorent maîtriser dense épinette fourré. Dans les fourrés denses d’épinettes pinsons épais picorent efficace.

Top, Tacita Dean, Ship of Death, from the series The Russian Ending, 2001, Photo-etching on paper, 45 x 68,5 cm. Via. Bottom, photograph by Alain de Rain, Untitled, 2014. Via.

See also.

Pinsons épaisseur picorent maîtriser dense épinette fourré. Dans les fourrés denses d’épinettes pinsons épais picorent efficace.

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Filed under: diptych 
April 4, 2014
Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.

Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014.

April 4, 2014
Photograph by Hans Bellmer, Untitled Study for Georges Battaille’s Histoire de l’oeil, 1946. Via.
—
What is mathematics? Most people would say it has something to do with numbers, but numbers are just one type of mathematical structure. Saying “math is the study of numbers” (or something similar) is like saying that “zoology is the study of giraffes”. Math may be better thought of as the study of patterns, but this too falls short…
The more I study math, the more I wonder about what exactly math is. Actually nobody knows. It seems to be a product or our minds, and yet reflects the external universe with uncanny accuracy. A mathematician develops a mathematical theory for its aesthetic unworldly beauty and its compelling evolution, with no thought of how it might be applied to the world. A century later a physicist finds this theory to be perfect to use as a framework to express his physics (this sort of thing happens frequently). Pretty weird how intimately connected our innermost “mind” and the outermost “universe” really are. This is a profound mystery!
Bruce Bennett, my advisor in grad school, defines mathematics as “unified consciousness theory”. As you come to master a branch of mathematics, it’s as though you’ve grown a new abstract organ of perception through which you may then view the world. You’ve grown a new “mind’s eye” that can perceive realities literally inconceivable without this new organ of perception.
Rafael Espericueta, Professor of Mathematics Bakersfield College. Via.

Photograph by Hans Bellmer, Untitled Study for Georges Battaille’s Histoire de l’oeil, 1946. Via.

What is mathematics? Most people would say it has something to do with numbers, but numbers are just one type of mathematical structure. Saying “math is the study of numbers” (or something similar) is like saying that “zoology is the study of giraffes”. Math may be better thought of as the study of patterns, but this too falls short…

The more I study math, the more I wonder about what exactly math is. Actually nobody knows. It seems to be a product or our minds, and yet reflects the external universe with uncanny accuracy. A mathematician develops a mathematical theory for its aesthetic unworldly beauty and its compelling evolution, with no thought of how it might be applied to the world. A century later a physicist finds this theory to be perfect to use as a framework to express his physics (this sort of thing happens frequently). Pretty weird how intimately connected our innermost “mind” and the outermost “universe” really are. This is a profound mystery!

Bruce Bennett, my advisor in grad school, defines mathematics as “unified consciousness theory”. As you come to master a branch of mathematics, it’s as though you’ve grown a new abstract organ of perception through which you may then view the world. You’ve grown a new “mind’s eye” that can perceive realities literally inconceivable without this new organ of perception.

Rafael Espericueta, Professor of Mathematics Bakersfield College. Via.

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Filed under: quotes 
April 3, 2014
Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.

Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.