July 22, 2014
Screen captures from the music video for The Knife, Pass This On, directed by Johan Renck, 2003. Watch.
Does he know what I do and you’ll pass this on, won’t you and? If I asked him once what would he say, is he willing, can he play?
Last night I watched young men play hockey. Accidentally, I stumbled upon this rink where they were training. I sat down to grab more of the warm air filled with their perspiration, shivering when the puck was hitting the distressed plexiglass, over and over. And now again I hear them.

Screen captures from the music video for The Knife, Pass This On, directed by Johan Renck, 2003. Watch.

Does he know what I do and
you’ll pass this on, won’t you and?
If I asked him once what would he say,
is he willing, can he play?

Last night I watched young men play hockey. Accidentally, I stumbled upon this rink where they were training. I sat down to grab more of the warm air filled with their perspiration, shivering when the puck was hitting the distressed plexiglass, over and over. And now again I hear them.

11:35am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmay1MAfsKu
  
Filed under: diptych Sound 
July 22, 2014

Salem, Better Off Alone, 2011. Unofficial music video by Matt Burgess. Via.

11:19am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmay1MAdSmN
  
Filed under: Sound TV framed 
July 21, 2014
Left, John Cage, from Lecture on Nothing, 1959. Via. Read it in its entirety. Right, Lutz Bacher, from the series Sex with Strangers, 1986, 9 B&W photographs, framed, 72 x 40 inches each. From the exhibition at Galerie Bucholz, Köln, April 2014. Via.
—
In Sterling Ruby’s 2009 video installation, “The Masturbators,” male porn stars jack off alone. Recently, while interviewing him for an unrelated magazine piece, I asked Ruby what it was like to work with the men. He told me that when the porn stars came in, they were mostly full of bluster, like—you want me to what? That’s it? Ruby nodded. Then watched as, one by one, the professionals couldn’t finish the job. Some of them broke down, almost crying. One screamed repeatedly to turn off the camera. Another got so upset he threatened to break down the door between him and the smaller man, the artist, and beat him up.
Ruby said a smart thing: that it was embarrassing to be a man, but he wouldn’t have it any other way. He also said he thought the US porn industry, a phrase I can’t tell if he meant synecdochically, was cruel for telling men to come on command. I agreed, but I also thought the men broke down in their small white rooms, one at a time in front of one camera, because they’d never before had to be the lone objects of a gaze. And, lacking the feminized receptacle without which the dick can’t exist, they began to feel, for perhaps the first time in a while, the embarrassment of just being human.
Sarah Nicole Prickett, from The Ultimate Humiliation, for n+1, May 2014. Via.
See also, The Masturbators.

Left, John Cage, from Lecture on Nothing, 1959. Via. Read it in its entirety. Right, Lutz Bacher, from the series Sex with Strangers, 1986, 9 B&W photographs, framed, 72 x 40 inches each. From the exhibition at Galerie Bucholz, Köln, April 2014. Via.

In Sterling Ruby’s 2009 video installation, “The Masturbators,” male porn stars jack off alone. Recently, while interviewing him for an unrelated magazine piece, I asked Ruby what it was like to work with the men. He told me that when the porn stars came in, they were mostly full of bluster, like—you want me to what? That’s it? Ruby nodded. Then watched as, one by one, the professionals couldn’t finish the job. Some of them broke down, almost crying. One screamed repeatedly to turn off the camera. Another got so upset he threatened to break down the door between him and the smaller man, the artist, and beat him up.

Ruby said a smart thing: that it was embarrassing to be a man, but he wouldn’t have it any other way. He also said he thought the US porn industry, a phrase I can’t tell if he meant synecdochically, was cruel for telling men to come on command. I agreed, but I also thought the men broke down in their small white rooms, one at a time in front of one camera, because they’d never before had to be the lone objects of a gaze. And, lacking the feminized receptacle without which the dick can’t exist, they began to feel, for perhaps the first time in a while, the embarrassment of just being human.

Sarah Nicole Prickett, from The Ultimate Humiliation, for n+1, May 2014. Via.

See also, The Masturbators.

6:59pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmay1M63C5T
  
Filed under: diptych quotes 
July 20, 2014

Fase, Four Movements to the music of Steve Reich, Choreography for two dancers by Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, 1982. Film directed by Thierry De Mey, 2002.

The four parts of the performance were filmed at four different locations: Piano Phase in the Rosas Performance Space in Vorst, Come Out in the new Coca-Cola building in Anderlecht, Violin Phase in Tervuren forest and Clapping in the Felix Pakhuis in Antwerp.

See also, Otto Piene, More Sky at Neue Nationalgalerie, and Einstein on the Beach.

(Source: chesswithineverything, via adult-mag)

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Filed under: Sound reoccurrence 
July 18, 2014
Top, Carina Zurino, Curtain Falls IX, 2013, Blue Pigment Print, Size 80 x 84. Installation view from the group exhibition Touching Light, on view at Peter Lav Gallery until August 16th. Via. Bottom, Scene from Macbeth, 1988, with choreography by Johann Kresnik and scenography by Gottfried Helnwein, Volksbühne Berlin, 1995. Via.
—
Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.
Sylvia Plath, from The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1982-2000. Via.

Top, Carina Zurino, Curtain Falls IX, 2013, Blue Pigment Print, Size 80 x 84. Installation view from the group exhibition Touching Light, on view at Peter Lav Gallery until August 16th. Via. Bottom, Scene from Macbeth, 1988, with choreography by Johann Kresnik and scenography by Gottfried Helnwein, Volksbühne Berlin, 1995. Via.

Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.

Sylvia Plath, from The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1982-2000. Via.

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Filed under: diptych quotes 
July 18, 2014
I now write from an old mind and an old body, long beyond the time when most men would ever think of continuing such a thing, but since I started so late I owe it to myself to continue, and when the words begin to falter and I must be helped up stairways and I can no longer tell a bluebird from a paperclip, I still feel that something in me is going to remember (no matter how far I’m gone) how I’ve come through the murder and the mess and the moil, to at least a generous way to die. To not to have entirely wasted one’s life seems to be a worthy accomplishment, if only for myself.

Charles Bukowski, from a letter to Black Sparrow Press publisher John Martin, August 12, 1986. Via.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
July 14, 2014

Fette Sans, La Reprise, 2014.

July 11, 2014
On Kawara, I Got Up At…, 1974-75. Ninety postcards with printed rubber stamps, 3 1/2 x 4 inches each and 4 x 6 inches each. Courtesy The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of John Baldessari and Denise Spampinato. Via.
The semi autobiographical ‘I Got Up At…’ by On Kawara is a series of postcards sent to John Baldessari over the course of three months. Each card was sent from his location that morning detailing the time he got up.

On Kawara, I Got Up At…, 1974-75. Ninety postcards with printed rubber stamps, 3 1/2 x 4 inches each and 4 x 6 inches each. Courtesy The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of John Baldessari and Denise Spampinato. Via.

The semi autobiographical ‘I Got Up At…’ by On Kawara is a series of postcards sent to John Baldessari over the course of three months. Each card was sent from his location that morning detailing the time he got up.

1:05pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmay1LAZSJO
  
Filed under: reoccurrence 
July 8, 2014
Top, screen capture from Les Amants du Pont-Neuf, directed by Leos Carax, 1991. Via. Bottom, photograph by Man Ray, Untitled, circa 1925. Via.
—
Mingled with this odd swirl of diffidence and cheekiness, of grandiosity and self-effacement, was the tendency among female mystics to take physical self-punishment to brutal extremes. Catherine overcame her revulsion at a cancer patient’s fetid sore by drinking a cup of the pus it discharged, and she was famous for her drastic fasting — she often inserted sticks into her throat to make herself vomit after eating. Bridget of Sweden poured hot wax on her flesh. St. Clare of Assisi slept on the floor in wintertime and fasted three days each week during Lent. “The men had work to do, so they didn’t have time for a lot of penance and suffering,” Noffke says. “Women were not to be seen, not to be heard, but they could suffer.” Priests tended to glorify suffering in women, and encouraged it in their confessions.
Jennifer Eagan, from Power Suffering, for the NYT, 1999. Via.
See also, Scout Parré-Phillips x Valie Export x Leslie Jameson, Tortures and Torments of the Christian Martyrs: From the De Ss. Martyrum Cruciatibus of the Rev. Father Antonio Gallonio, and Saint Agatha.

Top, screen capture from Les Amants du Pont-Neuf, directed by Leos Carax, 1991. Via. Bottom, photograph by Man Ray, Untitled, circa 1925. Via.

Mingled with this odd swirl of diffidence and cheekiness, of grandiosity and self-effacement, was the tendency among female mystics to take physical self-punishment to brutal extremes. Catherine overcame her revulsion at a cancer patient’s fetid sore by drinking a cup of the pus it discharged, and she was famous for her drastic fasting — she often inserted sticks into her throat to make herself vomit after eating. Bridget of Sweden poured hot wax on her flesh. St. Clare of Assisi slept on the floor in wintertime and fasted three days each week during Lent. “The men had work to do, so they didn’t have time for a lot of penance and suffering,” Noffke says. “Women were not to be seen, not to be heard, but they could suffer.” Priests tended to glorify suffering in women, and encouraged it in their confessions.

Jennifer Eagan, from Power Suffering, for the NYT, 1999. Via.

See also, Scout Parré-Phillips x Valie Export x Leslie Jameson, Tortures and Torments of the Christian Martyrs: From the De Ss. Martyrum Cruciatibus of the Rev. Father Antonio Gallonio, and Saint Agatha.

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Filed under: diptych 
July 8, 2014

Fette Sans, La Reprise, 2014.

Something from May that I have in mind today. And, watch #64.

July 7, 2014
Left, Tatsumi Orimoto, Bread Man, 2001. Via. Right, uncredited found photograph used by Ezra Johnson for an exhibition at Parallelograms, 2013. Via.
'Will you recognise me?' he asks. I pause, trying not to laugh, and wondering if I will recognise him without the bread.
—
I always knew what I didn’t want. That was the rule in my life. I absolutely knew what I didn’t want; that gave me the idea and the rest was intuition.
Robert Frank, interviewed by Robert Enrights and Meeka Walsh for Border Crossings, March 2013. Via.
I think negative ambition is a big part of what motivates artists. It’s the thing you’re pushing against. When I was a kid, my negative ambition was that I didn’t want to get a job.
Brian Eno, interviewed by Sasha Frere-Jones for The New Yorker, July 2014. Via.

Left, Tatsumi Orimoto, Bread Man, 2001. Via. Right, uncredited found photograph used by Ezra Johnson for an exhibition at Parallelograms, 2013. Via.

'Will you recognise me?' he asks. I pause, trying not to laugh, and wondering if I will recognise him without the bread.

I always knew what I didn’t want. That was the rule in my life. I absolutely knew what I didn’t want; that gave me the idea and the rest was intuition.

Robert Frank, interviewed by Robert Enrights and Meeka Walsh for Border Crossings, March 2013. Via.

I think negative ambition is a big part of what motivates artists. It’s the thing you’re pushing against. When I was a kid, my negative ambition was that I didn’t want to get a job.

Brian Eno, interviewed by Sasha Frere-Jones for The New Yorker, July 2014. Via.

July 6, 2014
The selfish masculinity of Dov Charney and Terry Richardson is very intimately related to the selfish masculinity of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush. Not that Bill Clinton didn’t also abuse power in a very masculine way, but at least under pressure he apologized publicly and vaguely pretended to feel bad about what he’d done, which was perhaps what ’90s toxic alpha masculinity was about. The supposedly liberal side of the culture just mirrored the neoconservative mainstream. The response to the 9/11 attacks amplified the masculine aggression. There was something perversely unapologetic and arrogant about the way we invaded Iraq under the false flag of liberation. It was about mass-marketing freedom when what was sold was actually nothing of the sort.

Molly Lambert, No Country for Old Pervs: The Fall of the Houses of Terry Richardson and Dov Charney, for Grantland, July 2014.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
July 5, 2014
Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.
Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.
See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.

Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.

See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

11:57pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmay1Kf5H7a
  
Filed under: diptych