July 8, 2014
Top, screen capture from Les Amants du Pont-Neuf, directed by Leos Carax, 1991. Via. Bottom, photograph by Man Ray, Untitled, circa 1925. Via.
—
Mingled with this odd swirl of diffidence and cheekiness, of grandiosity and self-effacement, was the tendency among female mystics to take physical self-punishment to brutal extremes. Catherine overcame her revulsion at a cancer patient’s fetid sore by drinking a cup of the pus it discharged, and she was famous for her drastic fasting — she often inserted sticks into her throat to make herself vomit after eating. Bridget of Sweden poured hot wax on her flesh. St. Clare of Assisi slept on the floor in wintertime and fasted three days each week during Lent. “The men had work to do, so they didn’t have time for a lot of penance and suffering,” Noffke says. “Women were not to be seen, not to be heard, but they could suffer.” Priests tended to glorify suffering in women, and encouraged it in their confessions.
Jennifer Eagan, from Power Suffering, for the NYT, 1999. Via.
See also, Scout Parré-Phillips x Valie Export x Leslie Jameson, Tortures and Torments of the Christian Martyrs: From the De Ss. Martyrum Cruciatibus of the Rev. Father Antonio Gallonio, and Saint Agatha.

Top, screen capture from Les Amants du Pont-Neuf, directed by Leos Carax, 1991. Via. Bottom, photograph by Man Ray, Untitled, circa 1925. Via.

Mingled with this odd swirl of diffidence and cheekiness, of grandiosity and self-effacement, was the tendency among female mystics to take physical self-punishment to brutal extremes. Catherine overcame her revulsion at a cancer patient’s fetid sore by drinking a cup of the pus it discharged, and she was famous for her drastic fasting — she often inserted sticks into her throat to make herself vomit after eating. Bridget of Sweden poured hot wax on her flesh. St. Clare of Assisi slept on the floor in wintertime and fasted three days each week during Lent. “The men had work to do, so they didn’t have time for a lot of penance and suffering,” Noffke says. “Women were not to be seen, not to be heard, but they could suffer.” Priests tended to glorify suffering in women, and encouraged it in their confessions.

Jennifer Eagan, from Power Suffering, for the NYT, 1999. Via.

See also, Scout Parré-Phillips x Valie Export x Leslie Jameson, Tortures and Torments of the Christian Martyrs: From the De Ss. Martyrum Cruciatibus of the Rev. Father Antonio Gallonio, and Saint Agatha.

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Filed under: diptych 
July 8, 2014

Fette Sans, La Reprise, 2014.

Something from May that I have in mind today. And, watch #64.

July 7, 2014
Left, Tatsumi Orimoto, Bread Man, 2001. Via. Right, uncredited found photograph used by Ezra Johnson for an exhibition at Parallelograms, 2013. Via.
'Will you recognise me?' he asks. I pause, trying not to laugh, and wondering if I will recognise him without the bread.
—
I always knew what I didn’t want. That was the rule in my life. I absolutely knew what I didn’t want; that gave me the idea and the rest was intuition.
Robert Frank, interviewed by Robert Enrights and Meeka Walsh for Border Crossings, March 2013. Via.
I think negative ambition is a big part of what motivates artists. It’s the thing you’re pushing against. When I was a kid, my negative ambition was that I didn’t want to get a job.
Brian Eno, interviewed by Sasha Frere-Jones for The New Yorker, July 2014. Via.

Left, Tatsumi Orimoto, Bread Man, 2001. Via. Right, uncredited found photograph used by Ezra Johnson for an exhibition at Parallelograms, 2013. Via.

'Will you recognise me?' he asks. I pause, trying not to laugh, and wondering if I will recognise him without the bread.

I always knew what I didn’t want. That was the rule in my life. I absolutely knew what I didn’t want; that gave me the idea and the rest was intuition.

Robert Frank, interviewed by Robert Enrights and Meeka Walsh for Border Crossings, March 2013. Via.

I think negative ambition is a big part of what motivates artists. It’s the thing you’re pushing against. When I was a kid, my negative ambition was that I didn’t want to get a job.

Brian Eno, interviewed by Sasha Frere-Jones for The New Yorker, July 2014. Via.

July 6, 2014
The selfish masculinity of Dov Charney and Terry Richardson is very intimately related to the selfish masculinity of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush. Not that Bill Clinton didn’t also abuse power in a very masculine way, but at least under pressure he apologized publicly and vaguely pretended to feel bad about what he’d done, which was perhaps what ’90s toxic alpha masculinity was about. The supposedly liberal side of the culture just mirrored the neoconservative mainstream. The response to the 9/11 attacks amplified the masculine aggression. There was something perversely unapologetic and arrogant about the way we invaded Iraq under the false flag of liberation. It was about mass-marketing freedom when what was sold was actually nothing of the sort.

Molly Lambert, No Country for Old Pervs: The Fall of the Houses of Terry Richardson and Dov Charney, for Grantland, July 2014.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
July 5, 2014
Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.
Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.
See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.

Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.

See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

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Filed under: diptych 
July 5, 2014
Left, photograph by Herbert List, Neighbors, Germany, 1931. Via. Right, photograph by Sophie Ristelhueber, Every One #3, 1994. Via.
—
What is an encounter?
It is a contingent, chance element of existence. Something happens to you that nothing among your existing world’s points of reference made likely or necessary. You encounter someone who you do not know and yet who strikes you, attracts you, enters into your life.
In your book In Praise of Love, you say, in substance, that there is no encounter without risk…
For it to be a genuine encounter, we must always be able to assume that it is the beginning of a possible adventure. You cannot demand an insurance contract with whomever it is that you have encountered. Since the encounter is incalculable, if you try to reduce this insecurity then you destroy the encounter itself, that is to say, accepting someone entering into your life as a complete person. It is precisely this that distinguishes the encounter from libertinism.
Alain Badiou, interviewed by Clement Petitjean, for VersoBooks, April 2014. Via.

Left, photograph by Herbert List, Neighbors, Germany, 1931. Via. Right, photograph by Sophie Ristelhueber, Every One #3, 1994. Via.

What is an encounter?

It is a contingent, chance element of existence. Something happens to you that nothing among your existing world’s points of reference made likely or necessary. You encounter someone who you do not know and yet who strikes you, attracts you, enters into your life.

In your book In Praise of Love, you say, in substance, that there is no encounter without risk…

For it to be a genuine encounter, we must always be able to assume that it is the beginning of a possible adventure. You cannot demand an insurance contract with whomever it is that you have encountered. Since the encounter is incalculable, if you try to reduce this insecurity then you destroy the encounter itself, that is to say, accepting someone entering into your life as a complete person. It is precisely this that distinguishes the encounter from libertinism.

Alain Badiou, interviewed by Clement Petitjean, for VersoBooks, April 2014. Via.

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Filed under: diptych quotes 
July 5, 2014
Top, spread from Daisuke Yokota, Linger, first edition published by Akina Books, London, 2014. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Beneath the Skin, directed by Cecelia Condit, 1981. Via.
See also, The Human Chair (人間椅子, Ningen-isu), a short story by Edogawa Rampa x Jamie Isenstein, and Bruno Munari, One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats, 1944.

Top, spread from Daisuke Yokota, Linger, first edition published by Akina Books, London, 2014. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Beneath the Skin, directed by Cecelia Condit, 1981. Via.

See also, The Human Chair (人間椅子, Ningen-isu), a short story by Edogawa Rampa x Jamie Isenstein, and Bruno Munari, One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats, 1944.

July 2, 2014
Fette Sans, Billy (two fifty), 2014. In progress.
Something new I am working on, which you will be able to see, then hung, tomorrow night (Wednesday) at King Size Bar here in Berlin.
See also, I am afraid you could have been misled, 2014.

Fette Sans, Billy (two fifty), 2014. In progress.

Something new I am working on, which you will be able to see, then hung, tomorrow night (Wednesday) at King Size Bar here in Berlin.

See also, I am afraid you could have been misled, 2014.

July 2, 2014
Top, photograph by Tung Walsh, from the campaign for House of Hackney, 2014. Bottom, photograph by Guy Bourdin, published in Photo France, July 1987. Via.
—
Since everybody knows that language is a heterogenous, variable reality, what is the meaning of the linguists’ insistence on carving out a homogenous system in order to make a scientific study possible? It is a question of extracting a set of constants from the variables, or of determining constant relations between variables (this is already evident in the phonologists’ concept of commutativity). But the scientific model taking language as an object of study is one with the political model by which language is homogenized, centralized, standardized, becoming a language of power, a major or dominant language…Forming grammatically correct sentences is for the normal individual the prerequisite for any submission to social laws. No one is supposed to be ignorant of grammaticality; those who are belong in special institutions. The unity of language is fundamentally political.
Deleuze & Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, 1980. Via.

Top, photograph by Tung Walsh, from the campaign for House of Hackney, 2014. Bottom, photograph by Guy Bourdin, published in Photo France, July 1987. Via.

Since everybody knows that language is a heterogenous, variable reality, what is the meaning of the linguists’ insistence on carving out a homogenous system in order to make a scientific study possible? It is a question of extracting a set of constants from the variables, or of determining constant relations between variables (this is already evident in the phonologists’ concept of commutativity). But the scientific model taking language as an object of study is one with the political model by which language is homogenized, centralized, standardized, becoming a language of power, a major or dominant language…Forming grammatically correct sentences is for the normal individual the prerequisite for any submission to social laws. No one is supposed to be ignorant of grammaticality; those who are belong in special institutions. The unity of language is fundamentally political.

Deleuze & Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, 1980. Via.

July 1, 2014
I failed at being a couple, but you don’t have to be a couple to participate in the couple form. You can watch movies about couples, you can listen to songs about them, you can watch them fuck on the internet. In fact there is nothing else to do. There must be a secret sympathy or secret correspondence between people that mimics or exceeds or subtends the global correspondences set up by commodity production. Or maybe just because we mostly emerge from families, we carry the family inside us, vestigially, as the fascination of the couple. Otherwise I don’t know how it is that romantic love endures as an image, even as it fails as a practice.

Hannah Black, The Loves of Others, for The New Inquiry, June 2014.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
June 25, 2014
This Friday, June 27th, if you happen to be in Berlin, come by ainsA in Kreuzberg. 9 pm. Some drinks will be served.
See also, À partir de sa quatorzième année, le rapport entre frère et sœur commença de s’améliorer;.

This Friday, June 27th, if you happen to be in Berlin, come by ainsA in Kreuzberg. 9 pm. Some drinks will be served.

See also, À partir de sa quatorzième année, le rapport entre frère et sœur commença de s’améliorer;.

June 25, 2014
Top, Bernard Faucon, Le Banquet, 1978, 29 x 30 cm. Via. See also, Musical Box. Bottom, photograph by Ludwig Hoffenreich, from the performance by Otto Muehl, Action no. 26: Food Test, 1966. Via.

Top, Bernard Faucon, Le Banquet, 1978, 29 x 30 cm. Via. See also, Musical Box. Bottom, photograph by Ludwig Hoffenreich, from the performance by Otto Muehl, Action no. 26: Food Test, 1966. Via.

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Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
June 24, 2014

Trans Am, I’ll Never, from the album Volume X, 2014. Via.

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Filed under: Sound