July 5, 2014
Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.
Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.
See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

Top, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, The Handkerchief’s Opera, 2014. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist, Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg. Installation view, MANIFESTA 10, General Staff Building, State Hermitage Museum. Via. More. Bottom, screen capture from Images of the World and the Inscription of War directed by Harun Farocki, 1989, 75 min. Via.

Farocki’s exhibition Serious Games is currently on view at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, and until January 18, 2015. It’s a great show, go and watch everything.

See also, Louise Bourgeois, Untitled (I have been to hell and back), 1996, fabric, lace and thread.

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Filed under: diptych 
July 5, 2014
Left, photograph by Herbert List, Neighbors, Germany, 1931. Via. Right, photograph by Sophie Ristelhueber, Every One #3, 1994. Via.
—
What is an encounter?
It is a contingent, chance element of existence. Something happens to you that nothing among your existing world’s points of reference made likely or necessary. You encounter someone who you do not know and yet who strikes you, attracts you, enters into your life.
In your book In Praise of Love, you say, in substance, that there is no encounter without risk…
For it to be a genuine encounter, we must always be able to assume that it is the beginning of a possible adventure. You cannot demand an insurance contract with whomever it is that you have encountered. Since the encounter is incalculable, if you try to reduce this insecurity then you destroy the encounter itself, that is to say, accepting someone entering into your life as a complete person. It is precisely this that distinguishes the encounter from libertinism.
Alain Badiou, interviewed by Clement Petitjean, for VersoBooks, April 2014. Via.

Left, photograph by Herbert List, Neighbors, Germany, 1931. Via. Right, photograph by Sophie Ristelhueber, Every One #3, 1994. Via.

What is an encounter?

It is a contingent, chance element of existence. Something happens to you that nothing among your existing world’s points of reference made likely or necessary. You encounter someone who you do not know and yet who strikes you, attracts you, enters into your life.

In your book In Praise of Love, you say, in substance, that there is no encounter without risk…

For it to be a genuine encounter, we must always be able to assume that it is the beginning of a possible adventure. You cannot demand an insurance contract with whomever it is that you have encountered. Since the encounter is incalculable, if you try to reduce this insecurity then you destroy the encounter itself, that is to say, accepting someone entering into your life as a complete person. It is precisely this that distinguishes the encounter from libertinism.

Alain Badiou, interviewed by Clement Petitjean, for VersoBooks, April 2014. Via.

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Filed under: diptych quotes 
July 5, 2014
Top, spread from Daisuke Yokota, Linger, first edition published by Akina Books, London, 2014. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Beneath the Skin, directed by Cecelia Condit, 1981. Via.
See also, The Human Chair (人間椅子, Ningen-isu), a short story by Edogawa Rampa x Jamie Isenstein, and Bruno Munari, One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats, 1944.

Top, spread from Daisuke Yokota, Linger, first edition published by Akina Books, London, 2014. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Beneath the Skin, directed by Cecelia Condit, 1981. Via.

See also, The Human Chair (人間椅子, Ningen-isu), a short story by Edogawa Rampa x Jamie Isenstein, and Bruno Munari, One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats, 1944.

July 2, 2014
Fette Sans, Billy (two fifty), 2014. In progress.
Something new I am working on, which you will be able to see, then hung, tomorrow night (Wednesday) at King Size Bar here in Berlin.
See also, I am afraid you could have been misled, 2014.

Fette Sans, Billy (two fifty), 2014. In progress.

Something new I am working on, which you will be able to see, then hung, tomorrow night (Wednesday) at King Size Bar here in Berlin.

See also, I am afraid you could have been misled, 2014.

July 2, 2014
Top, photograph by Tung Walsh, from the campaign for House of Hackney, 2014. Bottom, photograph by Guy Bourdin, published in Photo France, July 1987. Via.
—
Since everybody knows that language is a heterogenous, variable reality, what is the meaning of the linguists’ insistence on carving out a homogenous system in order to make a scientific study possible? It is a question of extracting a set of constants from the variables, or of determining constant relations between variables (this is already evident in the phonologists’ concept of commutativity). But the scientific model taking language as an object of study is one with the political model by which language is homogenized, centralized, standardized, becoming a language of power, a major or dominant language…Forming grammatically correct sentences is for the normal individual the prerequisite for any submission to social laws. No one is supposed to be ignorant of grammaticality; those who are belong in special institutions. The unity of language is fundamentally political.
Deleuze & Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, 1980. Via.

Top, photograph by Tung Walsh, from the campaign for House of Hackney, 2014. Bottom, photograph by Guy Bourdin, published in Photo France, July 1987. Via.

Since everybody knows that language is a heterogenous, variable reality, what is the meaning of the linguists’ insistence on carving out a homogenous system in order to make a scientific study possible? It is a question of extracting a set of constants from the variables, or of determining constant relations between variables (this is already evident in the phonologists’ concept of commutativity). But the scientific model taking language as an object of study is one with the political model by which language is homogenized, centralized, standardized, becoming a language of power, a major or dominant language…Forming grammatically correct sentences is for the normal individual the prerequisite for any submission to social laws. No one is supposed to be ignorant of grammaticality; those who are belong in special institutions. The unity of language is fundamentally political.

Deleuze & Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, 1980. Via.

July 1, 2014
I failed at being a couple, but you don’t have to be a couple to participate in the couple form. You can watch movies about couples, you can listen to songs about them, you can watch them fuck on the internet. In fact there is nothing else to do. There must be a secret sympathy or secret correspondence between people that mimics or exceeds or subtends the global correspondences set up by commodity production. Or maybe just because we mostly emerge from families, we carry the family inside us, vestigially, as the fascination of the couple. Otherwise I don’t know how it is that romantic love endures as an image, even as it fails as a practice.

Hannah Black, The Loves of Others, for The New Inquiry, June 2014.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
June 25, 2014
This Friday, June 27th, if you happen to be in Berlin, come by ainsA in Kreuzberg. 9 pm. Some drinks will be served.
See also, À partir de sa quatorzième année, le rapport entre frère et sœur commença de s’améliorer;.

This Friday, June 27th, if you happen to be in Berlin, come by ainsA in Kreuzberg. 9 pm. Some drinks will be served.

See also, À partir de sa quatorzième année, le rapport entre frère et sœur commença de s’améliorer;.

June 25, 2014
Top, Bernard Faucon, Le Banquet, 1978, 29 x 30 cm. Via. See also, Musical Box. Bottom, photograph by Ludwig Hoffenreich, from the performance by Otto Muehl, Action no. 26: Food Test, 1966. Via.

Top, Bernard Faucon, Le Banquet, 1978, 29 x 30 cm. Via. See also, Musical Box. Bottom, photograph by Ludwig Hoffenreich, from the performance by Otto Muehl, Action no. 26: Food Test, 1966. Via.

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Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
June 24, 2014

Trans Am, I’ll Never, from the album Volume X, 2014. Via.

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Filed under: Sound 
June 24, 2014
À partir de sa quatorzième année, le rapport entre frère et sœur commença de s’améliorer; une prédisposition analogue de l’esprit et une commune opposition aux parents les rapprochèrent tant qu’ils se comportèrent l’un envers l’autre comme les meilleurs camarades. Dans l’état d’excitation sexuelle orageuse de sa période pubertaire, il osa rechercher auprès d’elle un rapprochement corporel intime. Quand elle l’eut écarté avec autant de fermeté que d’habileté, il se détourna d’elle aussitôt et se porta vers une petite paysanne qui était en service dans la maison et portait le même nom que la sœur.

Sigmund Freud, À partir de l’histoire d’une névrose infantile, 1914. In : Œuvres complètes, T. XIII. Paris : PUF, 1994. In Freud et l’Homme aux loups: une scène pubertaire en commun, by Jean-Bernard Chapelier, published by Adolescence, issue #58, 2006.

Research.

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Filed under: linked excerpts 
June 16, 2014
Portrait of me, shot by Frank. I am traveling so regular posting will resume in a week.
And soon to be in Basel for the art fair - send me a note if you want to meet.

Portrait of me, shot by Frank. I am traveling so regular posting will resume in a week.

And soon to be in Basel for the art fair - send me a note if you want to meet.

June 9, 2014
Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.

Fette Sans, Film still from a film [homage to], 2014. Watch.

June 9, 2014
Top, photograph by Todd Hido, 1922a, from the series Foreclosed Homes. Via. Bottom, photograph by Peter van Agtmael, from the book Disco Night Sept 11, published by Red Hook Editions, 2014. Via. More.
See also, Nina Berman, Marine Wedding, 2010.
—
Arguably, the act of memory is an act of fiction.
David Mitchell, interviewed by Adam Begley for the Paris Review, 2010. Via.
—
These past few years we’ve witnessed an explosion of vocabulary as we struggle to conceptualize a new and terrifying time. Terms like distressed mortgages, toxic assets, underwater, along with repurposed words like ghost and zombie. A ghost loan, for example, involves a mortgage fraud scheme, where a 100 percent financed loan is inflated at closing, the buyer and seller in collusion to defraud the lender; in 2009, an ex-Labour MP was suspended after claiming a £16,000 “ghost mortgage” that never existed.
Dean Maki, managing director and chief economist at Barclay’s Capital, refers to underwater mortgages as zombie mortgages: home loans worth more than the underlying value of the house. Zombie foreclosures, meanwhile, are foreclosures originally done by careless foreclosure mills and dismissed, in places where a court is involved, without prejudice. That last part is key: it means that the banks can have a second shot at the foreclosure if they get their act together, and the foreclosure threat rises once again, as it were, from the dead. Zombie debt, on the other hand, involves losses that homeowners assume they’ve already written off. When a bank forecloses on a house and sells it as a loss, it can decide to pursue the homeowner for the difference. And then there are zombie homes, repossessed but unsold properties that bring down the value of the neighborhood, infecting them with the disease of future foreclosures.
We live among the undead. The things that used to have meaning and purpose—not just houses but banks and governments—have been emptied of what they once meant, and yet they remain, haunting us. We are, like the residents of Hillsdale, Illinois, haunted by forces larger than ourselves, imprisoned by the folly of the rich, who have unleashed some unspeakable dread from which we cannot escape.
Colin Dickey, from Unhousing - Foreclosed homes as haunted houses, for the Paris Review, March 2014.

Top, photograph by Todd Hido, 1922a, from the series Foreclosed Homes. Via. Bottom, photograph by Peter van Agtmael, from the book Disco Night Sept 11, published by Red Hook Editions, 2014. Via. More.

See also, Nina Berman, Marine Wedding, 2010.

Arguably, the act of memory is an act of fiction.

David Mitchell, interviewed by Adam Begley for the Paris Review, 2010. Via.

These past few years we’ve witnessed an explosion of vocabulary as we struggle to conceptualize a new and terrifying time. Terms like distressed mortgages, toxic assets, underwater, along with repurposed words like ghost and zombie. A ghost loan, for example, involves a mortgage fraud scheme, where a 100 percent financed loan is inflated at closing, the buyer and seller in collusion to defraud the lender; in 2009, an ex-Labour MP was suspended after claiming a £16,000 “ghost mortgage” that never existed.

Dean Maki, managing director and chief economist at Barclay’s Capital, refers to underwater mortgages as zombie mortgages: home loans worth more than the underlying value of the house. Zombie foreclosures, meanwhile, are foreclosures originally done by careless foreclosure mills and dismissed, in places where a court is involved, without prejudice. That last part is key: it means that the banks can have a second shot at the foreclosure if they get their act together, and the foreclosure threat rises once again, as it were, from the dead. Zombie debt, on the other hand, involves losses that homeowners assume they’ve already written off. When a bank forecloses on a house and sells it as a loss, it can decide to pursue the homeowner for the difference. And then there are zombie homes, repossessed but unsold properties that bring down the value of the neighborhood, infecting them with the disease of future foreclosures.

We live among the undead. The things that used to have meaning and purpose—not just houses but banks and governments—have been emptied of what they once meant, and yet they remain, haunting us. We are, like the residents of Hillsdale, Illinois, haunted by forces larger than ourselves, imprisoned by the folly of the rich, who have unleashed some unspeakable dread from which we cannot escape.

Colin Dickey, from Unhousing - Foreclosed homes as haunted houses, for the Paris Review, March 2014.

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Filed under: diptych quotes