July 23, 2012
Photographer unknown, Rosa Luxemburg, Simone de Beauvoir, and Emma Goldman, circa 1930. Edit: upon calculation, this joyous trio is unlikely, unfortunately for my romantic spirit. Rosa would be 59, Simone 22 and Emma 61, even the genes of heroes can’t be this fortuitous, sigh. Thank you for pointing this out.
Three extraordinary women serendipitously embodying three places I call home.
—
Solitude is a problem for writers generally, who spend so much time alone rehearsing a form of ideal communication. And men —as a practical matter — are often worse at being alone than women. But for male writers, however often an appearance of self-sufficiency can be stripped away to reveal a hidden structure of support, there is a writerly tradition of solitude that has existed at least since Romanticism: Rousseau’s “my habits are those of solitude and not of men,” or Shelley’s “Alastor; or, the Spirit of Solitude.” A man who chooses to be alone assumes the glamour of his forebears. A woman’s aloneness makes us suspicious: Even today it carries connotations of reluctance and abandonment, on the one hand, and selfishness and disobedience, on the other.
Emily Cooke, The Lonely Ones, for The New Inquiry, May 2012. Via.

Photographer unknown, Rosa Luxemburg, Simone de Beauvoir, and Emma Goldman, circa 1930. Edit: upon calculation, this joyous trio is unlikely, unfortunately for my romantic spirit. Rosa would be 59, Simone 22 and Emma 61, even the genes of heroes can’t be this fortuitous, sigh. Thank you for pointing this out.

Three extraordinary women serendipitously embodying three places I call home.

Solitude is a problem for writers generally, who spend so much time alone rehearsing a form of ideal communication. And men —as a practical matter — are often worse at being alone than women. But for male writers, however often an appearance of self-sufficiency can be stripped away to reveal a hidden structure of support, there is a writerly tradition of solitude that has existed at least since Romanticism: Rousseau’s “my habits are those of solitude and not of men,” or Shelley’s “Alastor; or, the Spirit of Solitude.” A man who chooses to be alone assumes the glamour of his forebears. A woman’s aloneness makes us suspicious: Even today it carries connotations of reluctance and abandonment, on the one hand, and selfishness and disobedience, on the other.

Emily Cooke, The Lonely Ones, for The New Inquiry, May 2012. Via.

7:25pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayPxbJdw
  
Filed under: quotes 
  1. gatodebruces reblogged this from wickedsisterhood
  2. demaupin reblogged this from wickedsisterhood and added:
    I really, really wish I could find out who these women were. I love this photo so much.
  3. protsentuaalseltprofessionaalne reblogged this from fette
  4. astro-nomical reblogged this from garconniere and added:
    (via imgTumble)
  5. scentfedcreatures reblogged this from viereckige-augen
  6. furore reblogged this from viereckige-augen
  7. inkyosa reblogged this from garconniere and added:
    Looking like this is why I bought a pipe even though I don’t smoke it.
  8. viereckige-augen reblogged this from garconniere and added:
    Rosa Luxemburg was murdered in 1919. But whoever they are, I love the pipes.
  9. garconniere reblogged this from fette and added:
    fette confirms my suspicions: i’m 99% sure none of these women are rosa luxembourg, simone de beauvoir or emma goldman....
  10. panishka reblogged this from fette and added:
    Solitude is a problem for writers generally, who spend so much time alone rehearsing a form of ideal communication. And...
  11. doubleothree reblogged this from fette
  12. wickedsisterhood reblogged this from fette
  13. danamariedotorg reblogged this from fette and added:
    I promise some new content soon!!!
  14. raskol reblogged this from fette
  15. some-velvet-morning said: in 1930 emma was 61, beauvoir was 22 and rosa was 60 which makes this kinda impossible
  16. fette posted this