December 31, 2012
Screen captures from raw footage I shot while a fire was igniting the first floor of the building I was living in. Berlin, July 2011.
Reflecting on Joerg Colberg’s recent essay “Meditations on Photographs: A Car on Fire at the Mall”, and on this line in particular; You photograph just like you look.
See also, Ghosts (After the Fire 1), and Ghosts (After the Fire 2).
I like to master my medium to the maximum, but do so with simple means. Like, I always use a simple 35 mm camera – I mean with a very good lens, but, I mean, it’s nothing crazy, not like a huge camera. Just something that… because, by being a normal camera, a normal 35 mm film, I find it’s closest to how people also see the world, and it’s closest to how I see the world.
Wolgang Tillmans, in an interview with Disturber Magazine, 2012. Via.
—
In der mann ohne eigenschaften, Musil wrote that we have more chance to hear about something extraordinary in the news than to actually live it. It’s in the abstraction that the essential of our life is happening, whereas minor, banal—yet paradoxically sometimes significant—events occupy our real life (e.g., death). “The news” [which today include social media] added an asomatous layer of extraordinariness to life that revealed itself capable of dulling real life at once. Overall, does it generate more boredom, or more excitement? (Also: the frontier between abstraction and real life happens to be episodically porous, when abstraction meets reality, when I come across that wraith in person for the first time after I imagined it dozens of times from pictures or rumors. The Eiffel Tower, a Pollock, Rachel Williams. And it’s always clashing a little because imagination is often wrong, as it severely clashes when you go from rumor to knowledge.)
Imp Kerr, New Lows, for The New Inquiry, December 2012.

Screen captures from raw footage I shot while a fire was igniting the first floor of the building I was living in. Berlin, July 2011.

Reflecting on Joerg Colberg’s recent essay “Meditations on Photographs: A Car on Fire at the Mall”, and on this line in particular; You photograph just like you look.

See also, Ghosts (After the Fire 1), and Ghosts (After the Fire 2).

I like to master my medium to the maximum, but do so with simple means. Like, I always use a simple 35 mm camera – I mean with a very good lens, but, I mean, it’s nothing crazy, not like a huge camera. Just something that… because, by being a normal camera, a normal 35 mm film, I find it’s closest to how people also see the world, and it’s closest to how I see the world.

Wolgang Tillmans, in an interview with Disturber Magazine, 2012. Via.

In der mann ohne eigenschaften, Musil wrote that we have more chance to hear about something extraordinary in the news than to actually live it. It’s in the abstraction that the essential of our life is happening, whereas minor, banal—yet paradoxically sometimes significant—events occupy our real life (e.g., death). “The news” [which today include social media] added an asomatous layer of extraordinariness to life that revealed itself capable of dulling real life at once. Overall, does it generate more boredom, or more excitement? (Also: the frontier between abstraction and real life happens to be episodically porous, when abstraction meets reality, when I come across that wraith in person for the first time after I imagined it dozens of times from pictures or rumors. The Eiffel Tower, a Pollock, Rachel Williams. And it’s always clashing a little because imagination is often wrong, as it severely clashes when you go from rumor to knowledge.)

Imp Kerr, New Lows, for The New Inquiry, December 2012.

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