October 17, 2013
Top, William Leavitt, California Patio, 1972, Mixed media (artificial plants, Malibu lights, flagstone, slider, curtains, wooden wall, and text), 96 x 144 x 96 inches. Via. More. Bottom, photograph by Larry Sultan, Backyard, Reseda, 2001, from the series The Valley. Via. More.
—
The camera plays on tombs, graves, trees, etc.A voice says: This is the cemetery.Then there are jangling sounds of something going wrong with the projector. The film ends. Inside the theater it should start snowing.
Kenneth Koch, from Ten Films, 1968 (?). Via.

Top, William Leavitt, California Patio, 1972, Mixed media (artificial plants, Malibu lights, flagstone, slider, curtains, wooden wall, and text), 96 x 144 x 96 inches. Via. More. Bottom, photograph by Larry Sultan, Backyard, Reseda, 2001, from the series The Valley. Via. More.

The camera plays on tombs, graves, trees, etc.
A voice says: This is the cemetery.
Then there are jangling sounds of something going wrong with the projector. The film ends. Inside the theater it should start snowing.

Kenneth Koch, from Ten Films, 1968 (?). Via.

8:44pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayxvQ5ws
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
June 30, 2013
Top, screen capture from Spring Breakers, directed by Harmony Korine, 2012. Via. Bottom, screen capture from N. a pris les dés, directed by Alain Robbe-Grillet, 1971. Watch on UBU.
—
N. a pris les dés is a reworking of Robbe-Grillet’s previous film L’ Éden et après, using alternate takes and re-editing that has the order of scenes to be governed by ‘a throw of the dice’.
VS.
"I had this idea," Korine told the LA Times. "With music remixes sometimes, when certain producers take a song and chop them up and deconstruct them - why not try that with a feature film? Using all different footage, making the same film all over again." Via.

Top, screen capture from Spring Breakers, directed by Harmony Korine, 2012. Via. Bottom, screen capture from N. a pris les dés, directed by Alain Robbe-Grillet, 1971. Watch on UBU.

N. a pris les dés is a reworking of Robbe-Grillet’s previous film L’ Éden et après, using alternate takes and re-editing that has the order of scenes to be governed by ‘a throw of the dice’.

VS.

"I had this idea," Korine told the LA Times. "With music remixes sometimes, when certain producers take a song and chop them up and deconstruct them - why not try that with a feature film? Using all different footage, making the same film all over again." Via.

3:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayoXzc6n
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
June 28, 2013
Top, photograph via the Jogging, shot by Aaron Graham (?), Modigliani On Couch, 2013. Via. Bottom, painting by Sara Clendening, 2013. Via. More.
See also, Modigliani reclining, and Kate Moss Obsession Ad, shot by Corinne Day.
—
Do you believe,” she went on, “that the past dies?” “Yes,” said Margaret. “Yes, if the present cuts its throat.
Leonora Carrington, The Seventh Horse And Other Tales, 1988. Via.

Top, photograph via the Jogging, shot by Aaron Graham (?), Modigliani On Couch, 2013. Via. Bottom, painting by Sara Clendening, 2013. Via. More.

See also, Modigliani reclining, and Kate Moss Obsession Ad, shot by Corinne Day.

Do you believe,” she went on, “that the past dies?”
“Yes,” said Margaret. “Yes, if the present cuts its throat.

Leonora Carrington, The Seventh Horse And Other Tales, 1988. Via.

June 24, 2013
Top, Bertolt Brecht, spread from Kriegsfibel,1955. See also the original manuscript from 1944. Middle, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, spread from War Primer 2, 2011. Via. Bottom Lewis Bush, spread from War Primer 3: Work Primer, June 2013.
When one searches “Bertolt Brecht War Primer” in Google, one mostly finds images from Broomberg & Chanarin.
See also, I think War Primer 2 appropriates more totally, borrowing from Brecht on three levels, the physical, the conceptual, and the ideological. And, The final 100 works were created by hijacking the original books, a process they found incredibly laborious. ‘The photographs were stuck in by hand, using an army of interns. It was a military operation,’ Broomberg says.
Holy Bible.
—
There are eyes everywhere. No blind spot left. What shall we dream of when everything becomes visible? We’ll dream of being blind.
Paul Virilio. Via.

Top, Bertolt Brecht, spread from Kriegsfibel,1955. See also the original manuscript from 1944. Middle, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, spread from War Primer 2, 2011. Via. Bottom Lewis Bush, spread from War Primer 3: Work Primer, June 2013.

When one searches “Bertolt Brecht War Primer” in Google, one mostly finds images from Broomberg & Chanarin.

See also, I think War Primer 2 appropriates more totally, borrowing from Brecht on three levels, the physical, the conceptual, and the ideological. And, The final 100 works were created by hijacking the original books, a process they found incredibly laborious. ‘The photographs were stuck in by hand, using an army of interns. It was a military operation,’ Broomberg says.

Holy Bible.

There are eyes everywhere. No blind spot left. What shall we dream of when everything becomes visible? We’ll dream of being blind.

Paul Virilio. Via.

6:07pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayo4bHgn
  
Filed under: quotes reoccurrence 
May 28, 2013

Fette, La Reprise, 2013. Watch the whole series from #1.

#7 will be made in/from Krakow where I am going for a few days, for the first time. If you happen to be there, you should write me, maybe I shoot you then.

May 21, 2013
Top, Adrian Ghenie, Persian Miniature, 2013, Oil on canvas, 118-1/8 × 114-3/16 inches. Via. Via Pace Gallery. Bottom, photograph by Alecsandra Raluca Dragoi, from the series New Year’s Traditions in Romania. Thank you Ferdinand.
—
There was something disquieting about the way an intimate object, seemingly withdrawn into its solemn steadfastness, could affect human emotions. Any old thing forgotten in a corner, if the eye dwelt on it, acquired an eloquence of its own, communicating its lyricism and magic to the kindred soul. If a neglected object of this kind were forcibly isolated, that is, divested of its warmth and of the protective coat of its environment, or even ironically combined with completely unrelated things, it would reassert its dignity in the new context and stand there, incomprehensible, weird, mysterious.
Werner Haftmann, Painting in the Twentieth Century, 1982. Via.

Top, Adrian Ghenie, Persian Miniature, 2013, Oil on canvas, 118-1/8 × 114-3/16 inches. Via. Via Pace Gallery. Bottom, photograph by Alecsandra Raluca Dragoi, from the series New Year’s Traditions in Romania. Thank you Ferdinand.

There was something disquieting about the way an intimate object, seemingly withdrawn into its solemn steadfastness, could affect human emotions. Any old thing forgotten in a corner, if the eye dwelt on it, acquired an eloquence of its own, communicating its lyricism and magic to the kindred soul. If a neglected object of this kind were forcibly isolated, that is, divested of its warmth and of the protective coat of its environment, or even ironically combined with completely unrelated things, it would reassert its dignity in the new context and stand there, incomprehensible, weird, mysterious.

Werner Haftmann, Painting in the Twentieth Century, 1982. Via.

3:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmaylV5Xyf
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
May 2, 2013
Top, screen capture from The Boxer, directed by Shûji Terayama, 1977. Via. Bottom, photographs by Tyrone Williams, Untitled, 2013. Via.
—
Very often you see this troubled man that a woman wants to save—unless it’s a stripper. So I found it really alluring. Going to Badlands for instance, she’s so innocent and so trusting and loving and accepts whatever he says and goes along with his reality even though he is an extremely troubled and bad person. And you just accept that she loves him and you don’t really question it. But it’s a really interesting thing to flip it and allow it to be a man with a woman. I’ve seen some distaste for that, like, why didn’t he get the fuck away from her? I’m glad, I want those questions to be raised because I see it a lot in cinema, this idea that women are supposed to accept that a man’s troubled. For instance, I was very fascinated when I was younger about Kierkegaard, and he said to Regina— the love of his life—that he was too dark to be with her. So he removed himself from her and wrote all these works like Fear and Trembling yet kept sending her manuscript after manuscript, which is like torture to this poor woman. But also being in love with someone and being like, I’ve already accepted that you’re this tortured soul and now you’re telling me that I don’t have the capacity to understand it. As if I don’t have any existential crises of my own? This idea she has to accept that he would be this way and just move on, and he would never accept her was basically what he was saying. So time after time after time narratively I kept seeing these stories of women accepting the neuroses or violence of men, the stand-by-your-man sort of idea. But never really saw it flipped on its head; so it was fun to play around with that.
Amy Seimetz interviewed by Hillary Weston about her film Sun Don’t Shine for BlackBook, April 2013. Via. More. I highly recommend you watch it.

Top, screen capture from The Boxer, directed by Shûji Terayama, 1977. Via. Bottom, photographs by Tyrone Williams, Untitled, 2013. Via.

Very often you see this troubled man that a woman wants to save—unless it’s a stripper. So I found it really alluring. Going to Badlands for instance, she’s so innocent and so trusting and loving and accepts whatever he says and goes along with his reality even though he is an extremely troubled and bad person. And you just accept that she loves him and you don’t really question it. But it’s a really interesting thing to flip it and allow it to be a man with a woman. I’ve seen some distaste for that, like, why didn’t he get the fuck away from her? I’m glad, I want those questions to be raised because I see it a lot in cinema, this idea that women are supposed to accept that a man’s troubled. For instance, I was very fascinated when I was younger about Kierkegaard, and he said to Regina— the love of his life—that he was too dark to be with her. So he removed himself from her and wrote all these works like Fear and Trembling yet kept sending her manuscript after manuscript, which is like torture to this poor woman. But also being in love with someone and being like, I’ve already accepted that you’re this tortured soul and now you’re telling me that I don’t have the capacity to understand it. As if I don’t have any existential crises of my own? This idea she has to accept that he would be this way and just move on, and he would never accept her was basically what he was saying. So time after time after time narratively I kept seeing these stories of women accepting the neuroses or violence of men, the stand-by-your-man sort of idea. But never really saw it flipped on its head; so it was fun to play around with that.

Amy Seimetz interviewed by Hillary Weston about her film Sun Don’t Shine for BlackBook, April 2013. Via. More. I highly recommend you watch it.

April 17, 2013
Top, photograph of/by Nobuyoshi Araki. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Mann & Frau & Animal [Man & Woman & Animal], by Valie Export, 1973, 16 mm, 10 min. Via.
—
Thinking about my “quite erotic” tag of that film I realize that as a viewer I am experiencing a sexuality like that of childhood - one motivated by curiosity, a prosaic pleasure in looking, but free from fantasy. It is quite unlike the experience of ordinary pornography which is invested with the erotic almost exclusively through its symbolization of power.
Joanna Kiernan. More.

Top, photograph of/by Nobuyoshi Araki. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Mann & Frau & Animal [Man & Woman & Animal], by Valie Export, 1973, 16 mm, 10 min. Via.

Thinking about my “quite erotic” tag of that film I realize that as a viewer I am experiencing a sexuality like that of childhood - one motivated by curiosity, a prosaic pleasure in looking, but free from fantasy. It is quite unlike the experience of ordinary pornography which is invested with the erotic almost exclusively through its symbolization of power.

Joanna Kiernan. More.

8:13pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayivd_Ny
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
April 4, 2013
Left, photograph by Sarah Parker in collaboration with Catherine Losing, from the series Totally Tropical. Via. Right, top, Frida Kahlo, Viva la Vida, Watermelons, 1954, oil on masonite, 59,5 x 50,8 cm. Bottom, Diego Rivera, Las Sandias, 1957. Supposedly, both paintings are the last ones executed by the artists. Via.
See also, Nobuyoshi Araki x Sharon Core.
—
I hate how people use the term “sex sells” when what they mean is “images of young women in very little clothing alongside anything is interpreted as sex”. Sex is not women’s bodies. The fact that so many people associate sex solely with women’s bodies is part of the problem.
Posted by Deoridhe at 12:29 AM on March 23, 2012. Via.

Left, photograph by Sarah Parker in collaboration with Catherine Losing, from the series Totally Tropical. Via. Right, top, Frida Kahlo, Viva la Vida, Watermelons, 1954, oil on masonite, 59,5 x 50,8 cm. Bottom, Diego Rivera, Las Sandias, 1957. Supposedly, both paintings are the last ones executed by the artists. Via.

See also, Nobuyoshi Araki x Sharon Core.

I hate how people use the term “sex sells” when what they mean is “images of young women in very little clothing alongside anything is interpreted as sex”. Sex is not women’s bodies. The fact that so many people associate sex solely with women’s bodies is part of the problem.

Posted by Deoridhe at 12:29 AM on March 23, 2012. Via.

5:04pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayht-HGY
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
April 3, 2013
Top, Gerhard Richter, Neger (Nuba), 1964, Oil on canvas, 145 x 200 cm. Bottom, photograph by George Rodger, Sudan. Kordofan. The Nubas. Dinka and Nuer girls dressed for ceremonial dance, 1949. Via. More via Magnum.
—
When Rodger’s photos first appeared in National Geographic in 1952 they enthralled many people, possibly none more so than Riefenstahl. On seeing the National Geographic story, the director of Triumph of the Will wrote to Rodger asking for his help to find the Nuba villages for a film project she was planning. Rodger refused.
'It was not long after the war, you see, and I was not feeling very partial to Nazi Germany in those days.' During the Second World War, as the German Army was retreating, George Rodger stumbled across Belsen and became first outsider and the first photographer to see the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp. 'So I wrote back (to Riefenstahl) saying: 'I am quite sure, considering your background and mine, I don't really have anything to say to you at all.' I never got a reply to that and it was about 15 years later she managed to find her own way there,' Rodger says.
Nevertheless, a note on the dustjacket of Riefenstahl’s first book, The Last of The Nuba (1973), under the famous wrestler photo, credits Rodger’s work for inspiring her. ‘The author was so fascinated by this photograph taken by the famous English photographer George Rodger (he is in fact a Scot) that for years she tried to find the Nuba in order to study the life of these primitive people.’ A personal inscription added: ‘Without the influence of your picture … this book would be never (sic) printed. Now we both are friends of ‘our’ Nuba People.’
Robert Block, Then and Now: In 1949, George Rodger took the picture opposite of a triumphant Nuba wrestler in central Sudan. It became one of the most famous of all photographs of Africa. Last month, forty-four years later, Rodger met another Nuba man - an envoy from a people now brutally persecuted, for The Independent, 1993.

Top, Gerhard Richter, Neger (Nuba), 1964, Oil on canvas, 145 x 200 cm. Bottom, photograph by George Rodger, Sudan. Kordofan. The Nubas. Dinka and Nuer girls dressed for ceremonial dance, 1949. Via. More via Magnum.

When Rodger’s photos first appeared in National Geographic in 1952 they enthralled many people, possibly none more so than Riefenstahl. On seeing the National Geographic story, the director of Triumph of the Will wrote to Rodger asking for his help to find the Nuba villages for a film project she was planning. Rodger refused.

'It was not long after the war, you see, and I was not feeling very partial to Nazi Germany in those days.' During the Second World War, as the German Army was retreating, George Rodger stumbled across Belsen and became first outsider and the first photographer to see the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp. 'So I wrote back (to Riefenstahl) saying: 'I am quite sure, considering your background and mine, I don't really have anything to say to you at all.' I never got a reply to that and it was about 15 years later she managed to find her own way there,' Rodger says.

Nevertheless, a note on the dustjacket of Riefenstahl’s first book, The Last of The Nuba (1973), under the famous wrestler photo, credits Rodger’s work for inspiring her. ‘The author was so fascinated by this photograph taken by the famous English photographer George Rodger (he is in fact a Scot) that for years she tried to find the Nuba in order to study the life of these primitive people.’ A personal inscription added: ‘Without the influence of your picture … this book would be never (sic) printed. Now we both are friends of ‘our’ Nuba People.’

Robert Block, Then and Now: In 1949, George Rodger took the picture opposite of a triumphant Nuba wrestler in central Sudan. It became one of the most famous of all photographs of Africa. Last month, forty-four years later, Rodger met another Nuba man - an envoy from a people now brutally persecuted, for The Independent, 1993.

April 1, 2013
Top, screen capture from Et Dieu… créa la femme, directed by Roger Vadim, 1956. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Shadow Film - A Woman With Two Heads, directed by Shûji Terayama, 1977. Via.

Top, screen capture from Et Dieu… créa la femme, directed by Roger Vadim, 1956. Via. Bottom, screen capture from Shadow Film - A Woman With Two Heads, directed by Shûji Terayama, 1977. Via.

10:19pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmayhfriKR
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence 
March 23, 2013
Top, photograph by Barnaby Hutchins, Untitled, 2013. Via. Bottom, Joshua Callaghan, Chicago Snow, 2012, eps foam, resin, glass, marble chips and sand, variable dimensions.
I went to Night Gallery today to see the new show Made in Space, sharply curated by Peter Harkawik and Laura Owens in which Mr. Callaghan makes a striking apparition with a new rendition of his snow pieces. I loved it. Like a pied-de-nez to Berlin somehow.

Top, photograph by Barnaby Hutchins, Untitled, 2013. Via. Bottom, Joshua Callaghan, Chicago Snow, 2012, eps foam, resin, glass, marble chips and sand, variable dimensions.

I went to Night Gallery today to see the new show Made in Space, sharply curated by Peter Harkawik and Laura Owens in which Mr. Callaghan makes a striking apparition with a new rendition of his snow pieces. I loved it. Like a pied-de-nez to Berlin somehow.

March 18, 2013
Left, photograph by David Brandon Geeting. Via. Right, John Baldessari, Foot and Stocking (With Big Toe Exposed): Kim, 2010, 8 color screenprint with paper and fabric collage. Via.

Left, photograph by David Brandon Geeting. Via. Right, John Baldessari, Foot and Stocking (With Big Toe Exposed): Kim, 2010, 8 color screenprint with paper and fabric collage. Via.

6:56am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHpmaygXMzWz
  
Filed under: diptych reoccurrence